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Tips for Safe Hunting in South Texas

By November 16, 2020SOGO Insurance
female hunter standing in woods with gun on her back

Tips for Safe Hunting in South Texas

It’s almost deer season, baby. As South Texans, we all at least know someone who hunts white-tailed deer, or we’ve gone ourselves in the chilly early November days. Some hunt for actual deer meat while others just enjoy the sounds and views of nature in the late fall/early winter. Maybe you’re headed out to a lease for the first time, or maybe you’re a seasoned veteran, but either way, there are several tips for safe hunting that any level of deerhunter should follow. This year has already been a tumultuous one, so keep the drama away from mama and follow these tips to stay safe while hunting this season.

 

Tell Someone You’re Going Hunting
We know – this one sounds obvious, right? But we don’t mean just to let every one of your Facebook friends know you’re headed to the lease. We mean that you should tell someone you can trust to get you the help you need in the event an accident should occur. Share the address and name of the lease you will be at, and plan times of arrival and departure so that your friend or family member knows when to expect you home. Don’t count on cell phone service to be the greatest when you’re out in the midst of white-tailed deer and other brush-country creatures. Turn on location services on your cell phone in the event an emergency crew needs to look for you. 

Take a Hunter’s Education Course
According to Texas law, every hunter born on or after September 2, 1971 must successfully complete a hunter education training course in order to hunt lawfully. But we suggest, even if you were born before then, to brush up on what you already know and take the course anyway. What could hurt? You can even take this course online, so wear your PJs and brush up on your hunting knowledge to be extra safe when you’re out in the field. At $15, it’s a low price to pay for some handy information that you can share with other hunters who may not have retained all the information taught in the class. 

Lock Away Guns and Ammo
Especially if you have kiddos tagging along with you, you’ll want to lock away guns and ammo when they are not being used. You never know when an excited kid gets brave and thinks they can handle a gun when they spot a moving animal, forgetting that there are other hunters moving about the lease as well. Accidental firing of shotguns are not unheard of, and an injury could be looming if you’re not careful. Always assume your gun is loaded, even if you’re “sure” it’s not. Handle the gun as a weapon that could fire any moment, even when you have it locked away. 

Watch the Weather and Dress for Success
The only thing worse than being too cold when you’re hanging out in the woods is being too cold out in the woods and still having to be “vewwwwy quiet” like Elmer Fudd says. Research the weather for the days you’ll be heading out, and dress accordingly. No one with you will have a good time if you decide to wear a flimsy t-shirt and you end up shivering in the chilly November winds while you’re trying to shoot a deer quietly. If you haven’t invested in snakeproof boots, settle for some gaiters that will protect your ankles and lower-legs while you trudge through the natural fields. You might not hear that bone-chilling rattle of a diamondback rattlesnake through your earmuffs, so dress appropriately and avoid being uncomfortable or unnecessary injuries that can ruin the whole trip. 

Check the Blind Before You Climb
If you are lucky enough to have a deer blind to help you scope out the goods, then do a quick check-in of the blind for four-legged creatures that have enjoyed the shelter during the offseason. This hilarious video of a raccoon in the blind is a good reminder of deer blind safety, but other not-so-funny events like a blind collapse have happened before too. Never check a blind with a gun in your hand, as you never know what will jump out at you and cause you to “scare-fire” your weapon. 

 

Wherever you head out to hunt this season, follow these safety tips to keep everyone happy and safe. Before you hop in the truck with all your gear, make a call to our SOGO agents to discuss your life insurance options. Anything can happen when you partake in potentially dangerous situations like hunting, even if you’re a seasoned pro. Check-in with our agents and make sure you’re covered for any situation. Your family is counting on you to keep them protected and well-cared-for, so make the call and invest in the future of your family with any of our broad options for life insurance and more.